What I Learned By Researching Competitive Titles

A common part in many book proposals is a “competitive works” section. I recently researched this for one of my book proposals. What I saw enlightened me.

First were three books from traditional publishers. They gave me pause. I had to think a bit to determine how my book was different and how it would stand out. This challenged me, but it was a good exercise. Each book was impressive: an attractive cover, nice title, a great concept or theme where the content flowed nicely, and professional editing and formatting. However, I didn’t think about any of these qualities at first. I expected these characteristics. Since they met my expectations, I gave these traits no thought – until I looked at some self-published books.

Next, I looked at some books that were self-published using CreateSpace. At first glance, the covers were of similar quality and the titles were almost as good. The content, however, was not the same. The concept of these books was lacking and their execution, disappointing. Also, the writing wasn’t nearly as good. One didn’t even appear to have been edited, with sloppy formatting and missing words – and that from reading less than one page. The fault in all this is not CreateSpace. CreateSpace is a tool. If you put garbage into the tool, you get garbage out of it.

Last, I considered a pair of self-published e-books; they offered no print options. These suffered even more. Their covers weren’t as good and their concept was questionable. As far as the writing, I didn’t look at enough to tell: the interior layout was so bad that I couldn’t force myself to read it. I almost didn’t even include them in my “competitive works” section because I didn’t view them as competition, merely a distraction.

From all this I’m reminded, once again, that self-publishing is an attractive option and an affordable solution when traditional publishers take a pass on our books. While this could be for reasons outside of our control, it might also be that our content is ill conceived or our book still needs work. Sometimes this is hard to determine, especially after we’ve poured ourselves into writing it.

Regardless, if we choose to self-publish, we need to keep in mind that our finished product must look like a traditionally published book if we hope for folks to take it seriously.

What is your experience in reading self-published books? Have you ever self-published a book? Please share your thoughts in the comment section below.

Save

Save

What do you think? Please leave a comment!