How Not to Design an Email Newsletter

I receive many email newsletters and would like to read them, but usually I don’t. The reason is they aren’t user-friendly. Here’s how they frustrate me.

  • How Not to Design an Email NewsletterThe email contains the headline (which is generally interesting) and a couple of teaser lines. I need to click on “more.”
  • I’m then taken to a webpage. I see the headline again and a few additional lines of text, but it’s still not enough to satisfy my curiosity. So I need to click on “read more.”
  • Now I’m taken to a second page for this specific item.
  • About half the time, a pop-up covers what I’m trying to read. I’m not interested in an ad, and I don’t want to sign-up for anything or login. Sometimes it’s challenging to figure out how to even close the pop-up.
  • By now I’ve lost interest and am frustrated. I close the webpages and delete the email. If I’m really irritated, I’ll also unsubscribe – and if I didn’t sign up for it, I mark it as spam.

But there are newsletters I will read – assuming they have relevant information that interests me.

Good email newsletters are self-contained within the email. This might mean they can be read straight through or that the headlines are at the beginning of the email with the linked text further down the page. Good email #newsletters are self-contained within the #email. Click To Tweet

This means no clicking – or only one click. I don’t have to leave my email program, and I’m not subjected to popups. Then I will take time to read it. And if we are cultivating an audience and building a platform for our books, isn’t that the goal?

What irritates you about email newsletters? What should you change in your newsletter? Please share your thoughts in the comment section below.

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