How to Be a Healthy Writer

8 tips to staying physically fit while spending hours at the keyboard

How to Be a Healthy WriterI’m not a medical doctor, and I don’t play one on TV. But I have complied a list of what it takes to be a healthy writer. Some I’ve learned through research, others through experience, and a couple by common sense.

The main thing is that as writers we need to not only care for our minds, but also our bodies:

Rest Your Wrists: Many years ago I did a stint as a tech writer, going from typing sporadically throughout the day to keyboarding for forty hours a week. Soon my wrists grew tender, and I lost much of my grip. In lieu of carpal tunnel surgery my doctor prescribed wrist exercises and avoiding typing on the weekends. That got me through it. Now, at the first hint of discomfort, I relax my wrists for a bit and resume the exercises. Some hardcore writers have added dictation into their mix to spare their wrists and reduce their need to type.

Comfort Your Back: My back used to bother me from time to time, so I invest in a quality chair, one fully adjustable and with lumbar support. It only takes a few minutes sitting in a bad chair to bring about discomfort. (I also use an inversion table for a few minutes every day, which I think is essential for me.)

Many people advocate a standing desk (and even a walking desk). But my back bothers me after just a few minutes of standing, so I can’t consider that. As a result, I have no problem spending a couple hundred dollars on a quality chair.

Two related issues are monitor placement and desk height. Sometimes raising or lowering the level of either one helps a great deal.

Guard Your Eyes: Staring at a computer screen for eight to ten hours a day causes fatigue. Proper lighting is key. I’ve tried indirect lighting without success, so adequate direct lighting is essential. Also important is monitor placement to eliminate glare.

Take Frequent Breaks: I take a break about once an hour, while some advocate writing for no more than thirty-minute stretches. My break may be a trip to the bathroom, a meal, or a walk to the library. Or it could be as simple as a walk around my chair or some quick stretches. The point is to not log long writing sessions without breaks.

Relax Your Shoulders: Years ago I hurt my shoulder as I pushed myself to paint our house during a weeklong vacation. The damage became permanent and some level of pain is always present. Using a mouse exacerbates this situation, so I am presently learning to mouse with my left hand (the muscle memory has been a bear to overcome).

Also during intense writing sessions both of my shoulders can tighten up. I do exercises to relax them.

Stay Hydrated: As with anything drink plenty of water. I don’t do coffee or tea and soft drinks are out. Water is my go-to beverage.

Sleep Well: Being well rested is vital. It’s also an ongoing struggle for me, but not for a lack of trying. As an alternative I sometimes take a power nap to help keep my mind focused and add energy for the rest of the day.

Exercise Daily: I have a moderate exercise routine that I do each day. It serves as one of my morning breaks.

What steps to you take to be a healthy writer? Are there changes you need to make? Please share your thoughts in the comment section below.

 

4 thoughts on “How to Be a Healthy Writer

  1. Thanks Peter, these are very helpful suggestions. Several years ago I did too much data entry in a period of two weeks and tore a tendon in my right arm. Surgery corrected it, but I still have trouble. Have to be careful not to type too long now. It is very hard to use the mouse with your non-dominant hand. Takes a lot of concentration.

    • Noreen, after a couple of weeks of left-handed mousing, I can do many actions without thinking and with acceptable speed. However, other actions require concentration (and elicit some frustration), but I am confident I will eventually become proficient with my left hand.

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